Recent News

Craven County Schools Recommended Accreditation by AdvancED

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By Dr. Cheryl F. Wilson

Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction

During a special called board meeting Wednesday, April 12, 2017, Craven County Schools district staff, administrators, school board members, and community leaders learned that Craven County Schools was recommended the distinction of accreditation from AdvancED.

AdvancED is a global leader in providing continuous improvement and accreditation to over 32,000 institutions worldwide serving over 20 million students. With more than 100 years of experience in accreditation, AdvancED is not the typical accreditation agency.  AdvancED is an international protocol for institutions committed to systemic, systematic, and sustainable improvement.

All Craven County Schools were required to assess themselves on five standards (Purpose and Direction, Governance and Leadership, Teaching and Assessing for Learning, Resources and Support Systems, and Continuous Improvement) categorized in three domains (Leadership Capacity, Teaching and Learning Impact, and Resource Utilization).  School leadership teams completed an analysis of  student performance data and stakeholder feedback data.  District staff simultaneously completed the same documentation to provide a comprehensive view of Craven County Schools.

One component of our internal review included the analysis of over 13,000 third through twelfth grade students, parents, and staff using either online or paper/pencil surveys in October 2016.  Throughout all of the surveys, the themes of high expectations of students and a focus on student success were evident.  Stakeholders also recognized building quality relationships, increasing parental involvement, and improving tangible resources as priorities for improvement.

An External Review Team of six educators from AdvancED visited Craven County Schools during April 9-12, 2017 to analyze and evaluate the documentation submitted by the schools and district.

As part of their analysis, the External Review Team visited 12 schools and observed 74 classrooms.  The team members documented their evidence using the Effective Learning Environments Observation Tool (eleot™).  The overall ratings for each of the 7 learning environments (equitable learning, high expectations, supportive learning, active learning, progress monitoring and feedback, well-managed learning, and digital learning environment) were above the average of schools in the AdvancED Network.  Additionally, the team interviewed over 300 students, staff, families, and community members as a part of their analysis.

The External Review Team analyzed and evaluated all of the data and provided valuable feedback and noted several themes in their exit report.  They found Craven County Schools exhibited the following themes:  sense of family, supportive school board, a spirit of collaboration, strong community connections, system and school leadership focused on excellence and alignment of grants with system’s purpose.

Accreditation is important to the citizens of Craven County.  The successful process ensures a standard of quality among the schools within Craven County as well as schools around the world.  Accreditation ensures academic excellence is required for all students.

A final report from AdvancED will be available once the recommendation for accreditation has been approved.  The report will be posted on Craven County’s website.

 

 

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Kindergarteners Receive an Unexpected Gifted

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Submitted by Pamela Holloway, Principal

Roger Bell Elementary is proud to share with you the story of a special group of Kindergarten students who when they set their mind to doing something they excel in reaching their goal. Mrs. Angela Baker’s Kindergartners have shown what kindness in action looks like. During December, our month of caring, they exceeded expectation in our food drive as one student, Thor, who is a “Do the Right Thing” winner, led the campaign for his class and brought in over 100 can food items, by reaching out to neighbors and family members to helped his class receive top school recognition. As that was where the story began, Mrs. Baker’s class began to have lessons on kindness and helping others. As fate would have it, our neighbors on the western end of the Craven County had recently experienced flooding and many families were still in need of assistance.  The students in Mrs. Baker’s class voted to give up their Christmas party and use the money instead for the flood victims. Mrs. Zelda Bryant, School Social Worker, helped by finding two Craven County school families (5 people), that were affected and could use some help. Following much discussion and several math lessons, the class decided to make $100 their goal, that would allow them to give $20 to each person. Just before Christmas break the class presented Mrs. Zelda with 5 $20 gift cards to Walmart! Mrs. Baker said, “My class is a very caring group and this lesson has made them better students and citizens.” Unbeknown to the students their act of kindness would be repaid. This Spring, the students were surprised by one of the recipients whom they helped. She gave Mrs. Baker’s class the party they did not have. The students’ act of kindness touched her and her family so much that she shared this good deed with members of the Bern City Motorcycle Club who in turned came with her to say “Thank you” to Mrs. Baker and the students in her class. While visiting the students had a chance to talk with club members, see and hear some of the amazing things they were able to do with their motorcycles and to ask questions about their schools and careers as their visit coincided with the schools College and Career Week.

 

 

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Truck Day at James W. Smith

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When the scent of diesel fills the air and large black wheels fill the parking, it can only be one day at James W. Smith, Kindergarten Truck Day! On this special day local businesses and members of the community unite to speak with our smallest students about what they do as a career, how they use their vehicle to help get the job done and what role they each play as a community helper. Kindergartenstudents get the opportunity to “touch a truck” and try on that important gear as they learn about the different careers. It was a great experience for everyone involved. Thank you to our community helpers for investing in James W. Smith!

 

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Our Take on Earth Day

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Shalyn Barnes, Jonathan Bauzon, Kale Calderon, Jodi Cook, Monique Kalonji. Arianna Nugent-Freeman, Nixon Prior, JonCarlos Rivera, Sophia Shisslak, Lyndsie Somers, Kenan Thornton, Malachi Warthen

Do you care if our Earth dies and you had not tried to stop any of it? Do you like a world full of animals, trees, wonders around every turn? Why should you care about the world and all of the inhabitants that live on it?

Earth Day is a very important day for the people that live on this planet. It is observed around the world on April 22. Many of us skip over and do not pay much attention to this holiday. We must admit we are all guilty of this! Maybe we need a refresher on why or how Earth Day came about. Before 1970, the health of the environment was not a common concern. Rachel Carson, an ecologist from Pennsylvania, published a book called Silent Spring. It raised public awareness of environmental concerns; it even became a bestseller! But it was not until 1969, after a massive oil spill in Santa Barbara, CA that people got worried and wanted to take care of the earth. Senator Gaylord Nelson, realized that if he could raise the consciousness about air and water pollution, it would force environmental protection onto the national political agenda. He inspired a movement that on April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans took to the streets, parks, and auditoriums to demonstrate for a healthy, sustainable environment through massive coast-to-coast rallies. It was in 1990 that Earth Day went global, 200 million people and 141 countries lifted the health of our earth onto the world’s stage.

Everyone can help the Earth in a way.
• You can separate your trash and your recyclables from each other. You may not think that separating them will make a difference but it will decrease pollution because instead of becoming garbage, the recyclables will be made into something else that we can use.
• When you go to the beach, try to look for litter and if you see some then pick it up. You can do this in your yard or along the sidewalks, anywhere you are, look around, pick it up and dispose of it in the correct container. The more trash that is left everywhere, the dirtier the Earth becomes. Thousands of animals die every year because of trash in their living area. Sea turtles die eating plastic bags thinking that they are jellyfish. Birds, aquatic (water) and terrestrial (land) suffocate from plastic six pack holders getting tangled around their necks. In each case, they choke and die. You may say, “I do not want to touch that litter”. Keep hand sanitizer in your pocket to use after your responsible action.
• See if you can ride your bike or take a bus to get somewhere, instead of driving your car, especially if it is an old car!
• Keep grocery bags in your car, take them into the store with you and reuse them until they wear out (then recycle them).

Remembering Earth Day should not just be when you click the picture on the main screen of Google! We need to remember it more because the earth is the thing we live on and we need the earth to live. Join us on Earth day to help the earth in many ways and remember WE CAN DO THIS ON ANY DAY! EVERYDAY!!

 

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2017 Middle School Battle of the Books Competition

 

On March 2, 2017 Craven County’s five middle schools gathered at West Craven Middle School to compete in the annual Battle of the Books competition. Students prepared for the competition by reading twenty-seven books selected by the North Carolina School Library Media Association. The list consisted of both fiction and nonfiction titles. Hard work and dedication showed with each team, as they competed for first place. Teams competed in rounds, where they took turns answering preselected questions that randomly covered content from books on the list. In the end, H.J. MacDonald took home the first place ribbon with a total of 151 points. Other teams placed as follows: 2nd Place with 138 points- West Craven Middle; 3rd Place- with 112 points, Grover C. Fields Middle; 4th Place, Tucker Creek Middle; and 5th Place, Havelock Middle School. Overall, teams, coaches, and parents had a great time participating in the event and look forward to cheering on H.J. MacDonald when they travel to Wilmington on Tuesday, March 21st to compete in the regional competition at the Minnie Evans Arts Center.

 

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Coach Robyn Register with her team after their victory during the Battle of the Books competition.

Back Row, Left-Right: Colby Whisnant, RJ Keehn, Ella McCants, Yolanda Perez, Becca Knight, Ailysh Murphy, Rebekah Lyan, Christian Styles

Front Row: Brent Hinckley

 

 

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Local Business supports HJ MacDonald Program

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 N01e643f814dd53740c14955d85353ad9d6537fc5ea (1)ew Bern, NC – In a late afternoon visit David Zink owner and Manager of Jimmy John’s on Glenburnie Road presented a check for $300 to Mike Haynes, Technology Students Association (TSA) Chapter Advisor.  The check was from the proceeds of the two Jimmy John’s School Support Days conducted in the last three months.  The money will be used to defray part of the cost for four HJ students who qualified to participate in the TSA National Conference and Competitions to be held in Orlando, Florida this summer.

David Zink is a great supporter of HJ MacDonald.  Mr. Wallace, Principal of HJ MacDonald and most of the staff presented a “Thank You” poster to David and the Crew during the second School Support Day.  When asked about the School Support Day Mr. Wallace said, “Our students are working hard and going beyond what is required in the classroom.  TSA is one of our many programs where students can explore things that cannot be done in every classroom.  The program is open to all of our student 6th to 8th grade.  Craven County is getting recognized at the state and national levels because of this great program.”

“More and more business are stepping up to help our school and these programs that are so important to the success of our community,” he added.  “It is only right that we recognize their support of our students and patronize them as often as possible.”

Four HJ students will compete in a variety of events during the National Competitions.  The estimated cost for each student is over $800.  Anyone wishing to assist in defraying the cost is asked to contact the school.

In the group picture: HJM Staff , Tabari Wallace (Principal), David Zink, and the Crew of Jimmy John’s.

In the other picture: David Zink, Jimmy John’s Owner/Manager present a check to Mike Haynes, TSA Adviser.

 

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Our Take on Earth Day

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Shalyn Barnes, Jonathan Bauzon, Kale Calderon, Jodi Cook, Monique Kalonji. Arianna Nugent-Freeman, Nixon Prior, JonCarlos Rivera, Sophia Shisslak, Lyndsie Somers, Kenan Thornton, Malachi Warthen

Do you care if our Earth dies and you had not tried to stop any of it?  Do you like a world full of animals, trees, wonders around every turn?  Why should you care about the world and all of the inhabitants that live on it?

Earth Day is a very important day for the people that live on this planet.  It is observed around the world on April 22.  Many of us skip over and do not pay much attention to this holiday.  We must admit we are all guilty of this!  Maybe we need a refresher on why or how Earth Day came about.  Before 1970, the health of the environment was not a common concern.  Rachel Carson, an ecologist from Pennsylvania, published a book called Silent Spring.  It raised public awareness of environmental concerns; it even became a bestseller!  But it was not until 1969, after a massive oil spill in Santa Barbara, CA that people got worried and wanted to take care of the earth.  Senator Gaylord Nelson, realized that if he could raise the consciousness about air and water pollution, it would force environmental protection onto the national political agenda.  He inspired a movement that on April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans took to the streets, parks, and auditoriums to demonstrate for a healthy, sustainable environment through massive coast-to-coast rallies.  It was in 1990 that Earth Day went global, 200 million people and 141 countries lifted the health of our earth onto the world’s stage.

Everyone can help the Earth in a way.

  • You can separate your trash and your recyclables from each other.  You may not think that separating them will make a difference but it will decrease pollution because instead of becoming garbage, the recyclables will be made into something else that we can use.
  • When you go to the beach, try to look for litter and if you see some then pick it up.  You can do this in your yard or along the sidewalks, anywhere you are, look around, pick it up and dispose of it in the correct container.  The more trash that is left everywhere, the dirtier the Earth becomes.  Thousands of animals die every year because of trash in their living area.  Sea turtles die eating plastic bags thinking that they are jellyfish.  Birds, aquatic (water) and terrestrial (land) suffocate from plastic six pack holders getting tangled around their necks.  In each case, they choke and die.  You may say, “I do not want to touch that litter”.  Keep hand sanitizer in your pocket to use after your responsible action.
  • See if you can ride your bike or take a bus to get somewhere, instead of driving your car, especially if it is an old car!
  • Keep grocery bags in your car, take them into the store with you and reuse them until they wear out (then recycle them).

Remembering Earth Day should not just be when you click the picture on the main screen of Google!  We need to remember it more because the earth is the thing we live on and we need the earth to live.  Join us on Earth day to help the earth in many ways and remember WE CAN DO THIS ON ANY DAY!  EVERYDAY!!

 

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Two Havelock High School Students Win CCEC Scholarships

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  April 5, 2017

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Havelock High School seniors Zechariah Felton, left, and Kirah Bryant, right, have each won a $4,000 scholarship from the Carteret-Craven Electric Foundation. Also earning scholarships are, from left, Nathen Mergen, Croatan High School; Alison Pagliuca, West Carteret High School, and Jonathan Burch, East Carteret High School.

Two HHS Students Win CCEC Scholarships

Havelock High School seniors Zechariah Felton and Kirah Bryant will be heading off to college this fall with some financial help from the Carteret-Craven Electric Foundation. These students and three others were selected from 29 applicants vying for scholarships of up to $4,000 each for four years of school. To qualify, the students had to be high school seniors in the current graduating class and live on Carteret-Craven Electric Cooperative’s lines.

The foundation earmarks scholarships for each of the public high schools in Carteret-Craven Electric Cooperative’s service area – East Carteret, West Carteret, Croatan and Havelock high schools. The fifth scholarship goes to the next highest scoring applicant among all the applications submitted, including non-public schools. This year’s winners are:

Felton is the son of Monica and Steve Felton. He is a member of several scholastic honor societies and plans to attend East Carolina. Bryant is the daughter of Jonathan and Sherry Bryant and plans to study nursing at UNC-Chapel Hill, with plans of becoming a pediatric nurse practitioner. She has earned academic and leadership honors all four years of high school and is involved in a variety of community service projects.

The three other winners are Nathen Mergen from Croatan High School, Alison Pagliuca from West Carteret High School, and Jonathan Burch from East Carteret High School

A panel of judges weighed financial need, academics, and extracurricular activities of all applicants to select the winners. The funds for this and other grants are generated by co-op members who voluntarily round up their electric bill each month to the nearest dollar. The foundation board, which is made up of co-op members, manages the funds. For the four-year scholarship alone, the board has granted more than $352,000 to help 878 students attend college since 2000.

Carteret-Craven Electric Cooperative provides power to more than 39,000 accounts in Carteret, Craven, Jones, and Onslow counties. The cooperative is part of a nationwide family of electric cooperatives exhibiting the core values of integrity, accountability, innovation and commitment to community.

 

 

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Tryon Palace Hosts Craven County Schools Student Art Show

*** FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ***

Tryon Palace Hosts Craven County Schools Student Art Show

NEW BERN, NC – April 1, 2017

Tryon Palace will host the works of art students from Craven County Schools in the Duffy Exhibition Gallery at the North Carolina History Center beginning Saturday, April 1. The free, annual K-12 Craven County Schools Student Art Show is presented by the Craven Arts Council and Gallery.

Featured in the gallery will be an array of art from students around Eastern North Carolina covering many different artistic styles and mediums, including drawings, pottery, paintings, and 3-D mixed media art.

The gallery will remain open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Sundays through May 29.

For more information call 252-639-3500 or visit www.tryonpalace.org.

Publicity images available for download here.

Upcoming events at Tryon Palace include:
April 4: Behind the Scenes: Costume Shop
April 7-9: Spring Garden Lovers Weekend
April 7-8: Spring Heritage Plant Sale
April 8: 9th annual East Carolina Pottery Festival

Tryon Palace Media Contact:
Craig Ramey
Director of Public Affairs
Phone: (252) 639-3511
Email: cramey@tryonpalace.org
Web: www.tryonpalace.org

 

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Havelock High School Student Council By Dr. Jeffrey E. Murphy

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John McLeod, Student Council Adviser, Alyssa Brashear, Student Council President

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Havelock High School Student Council 2017

 

 

 

The Student Council is one of the most productive student organizations at Havelock High School and Mr. John McLeod is the faculty adviser. The constitution for the Student Council includes the following purposes: to be a representative body for the students, to develop good citizenship, to improve morale, to provide a forum for student expression, to promote scholarship and to develop leadership skills. In addition, the Student Council assists in the orderly management of school activities and promotes harmonious relationships among students.

According to Student Body President Alyssa Brashear, “Student Council gives students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate social interactions and community awareness.  In addition, its members are able to serve as ambassadors for our school across the state. I have gotten to know many students and faculty members and others across North Carolina that I might not have met if it were not for the Student Council.”

At the school, the Student Council coordinates Open House twice a year, sponsors many homecoming activities including Spirit Week Dress-up Days, the hallway decoration competition, the Pep Rally, and the Homecoming parade. They also coordinate the merit-based Homecoming Court process. The Student Council also sponsors bi-annual teacher breakfasts and a Black-Tie Reception for current and retired teachers and staff. Furthermore, the Havelock Student Council sponsors two Red Cross Bloodmobiles a year.

Council members from Havelock High School attend the annual North Carolina Association of Student Councils (NCASC) Summer Leadership Conference at Mars Hill University. Havelock students have also served as delegates to the NCASC State Convention and at the National Association of Student Councils’ (NASC) National Conference in Oregon.

According to Mr. John McLeod, a recent winner of the 2017 NASC Platinum Lifetime Achievement Award, “Student Council provides opportunities for learning and growth that cannot be found in the classroom or measured by a test. Teamwork, problem solving, and stress management are just some of the skills practiced by Student Council members. Plus, we get to have fun!” Mr. McLeod was a finalist for the 2016 National Association of Student Councils Adviser of the Year and currently serves as the NCASC Eastern District Director. He has been the Student Council adviser at Havelock High School for thirty years. According to Mr. McLeod, “Student Council at Havelock High School has become a family for me and many others. I love it!”

 

 

 

 

 

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